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Bowel cleansing before colonoscopy and breastfeeding

Just recently I have been contacted by several mothers who were told that they cant breastfeeding during the 24 hour period of bowel prep prior to a colonoscopy or for 24 hours following the procedure under sedation. This is not supported by research and understanding of the pharmacokinetics of the drugs used. It is also a potential risk in that the mother may develop blocked ducts or mastitis necessitating antibiotics if she is unable to express her milk, or in many cases hasn’t been advised to! Not all babies will drink from a bottle so may become dehydrated. Some babies are allergic to cow’s milk protein and may be compromised by 3 days of artificial formula. Hence this fact sheet on the bowel preparations generally used.

It is acceptable to breastfeed as normal during bowel prep. The mother should drink freely of the allowed clear fluids. Someone may be needed to look after the baby during rapid need to evacuate bowels – unless you have taken these products you cant begin to understand the urgency!

http://www.breastfeeding-and-medication.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Moviprep-and-breastfeeding.pdf

Midazolam as a sedative for procedures in breastfeeding mothers

The reason I write these factsheets is in response to the questions which are posed to me on social media. I have included the use of midazolam in fact sheets on colonoscopy, endoscopy and dental sedation on information on the Breastfeeding Network but still mothers are told that they need to delay procedures, are only allowed gas and air during the procedure or must stop breastfeeding for 24 hours. The latter is recommended by the manufacturers but since the half life is 3 hours it is all gone from the mother’s body and therefore her milk within 15 hours. Those 9 hours make a massive difference to a breastfeeding dyad which seems to be ignored by the professional

http://www.breastfeeding-and-medication.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/colonoscopy-and-breastfeeding.pdf

http://www.breastfeeding-and-medication.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/dental-sedation-and-breastfeeding.pdf

http://www.breastfeeding-and-medication.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/endoscopy-and-breastfeeding.pdf

This factsheet contains information taken from my book Breastfeeding and Medication 2018. I hope it helps breastfeeding mums and professionals

http://www.breastfeeding-and-medication.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/midazolam.pdf

Accidentally taking one dose of aspirin when breastfeeding

It is surprising how often mums manage to take products containing aspirin by mistake – they are given by well meaning partners, friends at the office or just taken quickly for pain. Then the realisation that aspirin is contra indicated in breastfeeding. What to do? How long to express?

The answer is actually simple with one single accidental exposure. The risk is low and I have been unable to find any references associating Reye’s syndrome with the amount of aspirin passing through breastmilk.

Reye’s syndrome This is a rare syndrome, characterised by acute encephalopathy and fatty degeneration of the liver, usually after a viral illness or chickenpox. The incidence is falling but sporadic cases are still reported. It was often associated with the use of aspirin during the prodromal illness. Few cases occur in white children under 1 year although it is more common in black infants in this age group. Many children retrospectively examined show an underlying inborn error of metabolism.

http://www.breastfeeding-and-medication.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/accidental-aspirin-3.pdf


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Sleep problems when breastfeeding

One of the hardest questions I have to answer. I want to help but I need to keep the breastfed baby safe too

Sleeping tablets

Avoid if possible. Use for as short a time as possible. Observe baby for drowsiness. Avoid falling asleep with the baby in bed, on a chair or sofa

Committee on Safety of Medicines advice

1 Benzodiazepines are indicated for the short-term relief (two to four weeks only) of anxiety that is severe, disabling or subjects the individual to unacceptable distress, occurring alone or in association with insomnia or short-term psychosomatic, organic or psychotic illness.

2 The use of benzodiazepines to treat short-term ‘mild’ anxiety is inappropriate and unsuitable.

3 Benzodiazepines should be used to treat insomnia only when it is severe, disabling, or the individual is caused extreme distress.

http://www.breastfeeding-and-medication.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/sleeping-tablets-7.pdf

Change to recommendation on the use of Teething gels containing lidocaine.

We all know as parents how hard it is to comfort a baby who is teething and to witness their distress. As a pharmacist, mother and grandmother I know that the standard products often recommended in the past contained a local anaesthetic often lidocaine.

In 2014 the FDA in USA first raised concerns stating that “Topical pain relievers and medications that are rubbed on the gums are not necessary or even useful because they wash out of the baby’s mouth within minutes, and they can be harmful”.

Today the MHRA have announced that parents and caregivers are being advised that products containing lidocaine used for teething in babies and children will be sold only in pharmacies, under the supervision of a pharmacist from the beginning of 2019. The MHRA review concluded there is a lack of evidence of benefit to using products containing lidocaine for teething before non-medicinal options. Evidence of any risk associated with these products is very small given the wide usage of these medicines. A pharmacist or healthcare professional can provide appropriate guidance. Teething is a natural process and lidocaine containing teething products such as teething gels should only be used as a second line of treatment after discussion with and guidance of a healthcare professional.

It is suggested that parents try non-medicine options such as rubbing or massaging the gums or a teething ring before considering teething gels after discussion with a pharmacist.

Further information can be found :
www.gov.uk/government/news/teething-gels-for-babies-and-children-to-be-sold-in-pharmacies-only

And a patient information leaflet: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/5c0fd7cbed915d0c736a1e64/Lidocaine-patient-sheet.pdf

La Leche League GB have produced an excellent article on teething which can be accessed www.laleche.org.uk/breastfeeding-and-teething/#Pain.

The NHS also has sound information: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/teething-tips/

Products include Dentinox gel ®, Calgel ®, Bonjela ®, Anbesol gel ®

MBRRACE-UK report concern over the safety of drugs in breastmilk in one case

MBRRACE–UK released their 5th report ‘Saving Lives, Improving Mothers’ Care’. It describes the lessons learned to inform maternity care from the UK and Ireland Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths and Morbidity from 2014-2016. Here’s The Breastfeeding Network’s response.

The Breastfeeding Network (BfN) welcomes the report. While the research has found that the number of women dying as a consequence of complications during or after pregnancy remains low in the UK – with fewer than 10 out of every 100,000 pregnant women dying in pregnancy or around childbirth, the report highlights the unacceptable disparity in care for black and ethnic minority women. Shereen Fisher, Chief Executive for the Breastfeeding Network said, ‘The almost five-fold higher mortality rate amongst black women compared with white women requires urgent explanation and action. BfN welcome further exploration into this unacceptable disparity to ensure there is real change for black and ethnic minority women’.

A key concern, is the tragic case of a mother dying several weeks after her baby was born (Commencing treatment, dose and compliance page 39). There were delays in prescribing thromboprophylaxis because of concerns over breastfeeding.

Dr Wendy Jones, lead pharmacist for the BfN Drugs in Breastmilk Information service, said ‘I have long feared such a scenario. Physicians need to be aware how to check that a drug treatment is compatible with breastfeeding quickly, using evidence-based sources. The drugs in this case are widely used in the immediate postnatal period yet emergency medicine teams are often unable to access readily available evidence-based information on medication and breastfeeding as quickly as they need. The information should have been readily available in guidelines or a reference source including specialist information. The wording of the BNF: “Due to the relatively high molecular weight and inactivation in the gastro-intestinal tract, passage into breast-milk and absorption by the nursing infant are likely to be negligible, however manufacturers advise avoid” needs to be updated where the manufacturer is merely not taking responsibility in licensing the product. The removal of the words “manufacturer advises avoid” makes the information read very differently to a busy practitioner’.

Shereen Fisher, Chief Executive for the Breastfeeding Network said, ‘This sad case highlights the need for mothers to be able to access skilled support in their local communities, with staff alert for symptoms needing attention; the mother in question had multiple ‘fainting’ episodes postnatally that were not investigated until day 44. This emphasises the need for health care professionals in all front-line services to understand how to treat pregnant and breastfeeding mothers – until this happens women will continue to be exposed to risk and potentially loss of life. It feels that no-one listened to the mother or observed her and her baby as a dyad as closely as they should have done, possibly because breastfeeding was seen as a barrier to medication. Women should not be disadvantaged in the management of acute illness just because they are pregnant or breastfeeding, and communication needs to be improved throughout the multidisciplinary team.’

To read more you can download the full report, lay summary and the infographic here: https://www.npeu.ox.ac.uk/mbrrace-uk/reports

Breastfeeding and Orlistat for Weight Loss

orlistat and breastfeeding

Breastfeeding and lowering / stopping milk supply

Sometimes mothers want to reduce their breastmilk supply. I’ve provided some information and links on herbs and medications – some things have evidence of effectiveness, many do not.

lowering or stopping breastmilk supply

Progesterone (Cyclogest) and breastfeeding

Mothers who have suffered the trauma of previous miscarriages may be prescribed progesterone pessaries as soon as they become pregnant. This information sheet is designed to ease some of the worries in this situation or in the use of progesterone in IVF where a mother continues to breastfeed

progesterone (cyclogest) and breastfeeding

MRI, gadolineum and breastfeeding

There are ongoing queries about the use of gadolineum as a contrast agent for MRI procedures. This is the research I have accessed which suggests there is no need to interrupt breastfeeding at all

MRI and breastfeeding

MRI and breastfeeding